s
JUICING, NOT JUST A FOOD FAD

JUICING, NOT JUST A FOOD FAD

Nutritionist Gabriela Peacock explains the health benefits of juicing when expecting

In a few years you may be begging your little one to eat their greens, but for now it’s important that you consume enough nutrients during your pregnancy. Enter juicing – a fast and easy way to increase your fruit and vegetable intake while expecting. No passing trend, this health craze has the seal of approval from the experts.

Gabriela Peacock, one of London’s top nutritionists, explains, “Pregnant women need folic acid for a healthy pregnancy. Juicing green vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli might be a useful addition to your diet for their folate content. Green vegetables also contain iron and calcium – both of which are important nutrients for boosting the immune system and improving skin. They can also help to keep the heart healthy.”

The model-turned-nutritionist recommends including a variety of fruits and vegetables in every serve. She suggests a mix of apple, spinach, ginger, lemon, pineapple, cucumber and celery. Iron from spinach helps form new blood cells, while vitamin C in apple and lemon assists iron absorption and boosts immune health.

There’s no need to store away the Nutribullet once your little one has arrived. “Many new mums find themselves wanting to shift a bit of baby weight without compromising on nutrition while breastfeeding and managing a newborn,” she says. Healthy eating that doesn’t require hours in the kitchen? Where do we sign?

TRY IT AT HOME…

Kick start your morning with a concoction that’s perfect for pregnancy. Shirin Kouros and Yasmine Larizadeh of The Good Life Eatery located in Chelsea, London, recommend their ‘Lucky 7’ juice. “Beetroot is packed with iron and folic acid. The juice is also high in Vitamin C for energy, while the kick of ginger is great for swelling or nausea,” explains Kouros. Just blitz the ingredients below.

2 beetroot
2 carrots
1/2 cup of pineapple
1/2 apple
1/2 lemon
1 large orange
1 piece of raw ginger (about 1 inch long)

www.goodlifeeatery.com & www.gpnutrition.co.uk

Image courtesy of Instagram @coconutshelle

Words by Kate Curran

top